Daily Life, Parenting

International Pregnancy & Infant Loss Remembrance Day: This Is Our Story

I vividly remember the day I found out that I was pregnant.  I had this strange urge to grab a home pregnancy test on my way back from work. It hadn’t missed my period and, other than feeling tired that week, I wasn’t exhibiting any of those “tell tale” symptoms associated with pregnancy (I would later come to discover that most of those symptoms don’t even surface until around week 6-8). The next morning, I quietly took the test in the comfort our our master bathroom and was shocked to see a positive result. It was a happy surprise. Joyful tears flowed down my face as I realized that life was stirring inside me. In the weeks that followed before our first prenatal appointment, we shared our happy news only with close friends and family. It wasn’t until after our first ultrasound that we shared the news of our impending arrival with our extended network of friends and co-workers. Like many new expectant parents, we were under the impression that our baby would be one that we would take home from the hospital and love as he or she grew into an independent person. We were mistaken.

In early November, my husband and I headed to a routine prenatal visit where we were excited to hear our sweet baby’s heartbeat via doppler. Elation soon turned into worry as my OB doctor referred us to a prenatal imaging center for an ultrasound. It was there that we would discover that the child we thought we would take home would never be an outside baby. For parents who have never experienced a loss, it’s hard to fathom how heartbreaking that news can be. For several weeks I had developed this relationship with the child I thought would be mine and it was stripped from me. It hurt and I didn’t understand. It was the worst moment of my life. My doctor recommended a D&C in the days that followed after we received the news and I was told that we were clear to start trying again at the end of December 2009 or early January 2010. The prospect of “trying” was scary. There are so many uncertainties associated with getting pregnant after a loss and the thought of losing another baby can be overwhelming but our loss made me realize how much I wanted a healthy baby and I knew we would have to eventually move on and try in order for that to happen.

By April 2010, after months of charting, ovulation tests, and negative home pregnancies, I was losing faith. If I could get pregnant without even trying the first time, why wasn’t it happening this time?! Everywhere I looked, it seemed, other women were getting pregnant, having babies, and enjoying the life that I thought would be mine and I wasn’t. By the first week of June 2010, the realization that our due date was upon me. My husband and I decided to take a couple days off of work to spend together, doing something fun, in memory of the child that never made it home. Later that month, on the 22nd, I found out that I was pregnant with my daughter.

I had just arrived at a good place, emotionally, after mourning the loss of our baby, and I was scared that it might happen again. I feared every cramp and ache fearful that it might mean the worst. I took home pregnancy tests periodically (pretty much throughout my first trimester) just to make sure that they were still showing up positive. Thankfully, Charlotte Grace came into this world in February 2011 after a healthy and relatively text book pregnancy. Not a day goes by that I’m not thankful for her presence in my life. The takeaway that I gained from my experience in loss is that it’s hard and it’s okay to be angry, heartbroken, and sad. It’s okay to mourn the loss of something that should have been yours.

I was certain that our first baby was a boy. So we named him Elijah Steven. I keep a box with his first ultrasound picture, a few congratulatory cards we received from friends and family, and a little teddy bear we had purchased as a gift for our baby shortly after we found out we were expecting. These keepsakes are likely things that I will share with my own daughter one day down the road as we talk about life, loss, and family. If you’re mourning a loss of your own, know that you’re not alone and that it’s okay to be sad. Sometimes sharing your story is a good way to let other women know that they always have support.

In honor of International Pregnancy & Infant Loss Remembrance Day, I wanted to share with you some information about “Count The Kicks“, a campaign that aims at saving the lives of unborn children in late pregnancy.  Although stillbirth is vastly different from what I experienced (which was a miscarriage), I think the Count The Kicks mission is important and I encourage you all to take a look at this video: 

To join the movement, start by visiting and liking the Count the Kicks Facebook page. 

 

 

Culture, Current Events, Mad About It Mondays, Rants, Society

Mad About It Mondays: Celeb Edition

Mad About It Mondays

In case you’ve been living under a rock and haven’t heard yet: Kanye and Kim are going to have a baby. Baby Kimye is expected to make his or her arrival sometime in early June.

I will be the first to tell you that I’m pretty boring. I don’t have a television in my living room, I don’t subscribe to cable, I don’t get any of the “on trend” gossip/fashion/celebrity magazines, and I don’t really know who most of the up and coming, new musicians are. I’m not on the up and up and, quite frankly, I don’t really care. I think that’s why I find all this “breaking news” about the pregnancy of Kim Kardashian to be so incredibly annoying.

As a society, we’re so overloaded with the people the media tells us are supposed to be ‘role models’ for our children that we lose sight of the people who actually matter (no offense, Kim). Why on Earth is this considered breaking news? There’s a reason why I don’t have cable or magazines…it’s because I try to avoid it. That is seemingly impossible anymore because it’s everywhere. It’s on my Yahoo! page before I check my email, it’s all over Facebook, it’s on my “news” app on my phone. It’s constantly in your face.

Who would I like C to look up to when she gets older? Strong females who do what they can to positively impact the world around them. I want her to look up to men and women who use their brains, skills, and abilities to make a difference. I want her to look up to the real role models, like teachers, firefighters, police officers, doctors, nurses, farmers, and anyone else who does what they can with what they have to make this world a better place. I’d like C to focus on issues that matter like what’s going on in our community, in our state, in our country, and in the world.

I’m not saying that I won’t ever support her when she looks up to someone famous, I just don’t think their personal lives should be such ‘breaking news’. I can’t imagine how frustrating that must be for them…being constantly bombarded by photographers looking to get a shot of the latest non-existent ‘bump’ (she’s not very far along).

I’ll end this short rant with this…because I think that Kayne West is one of the more obnoxious celebs out there. I imagine that when Jessica Simpson delivers her baby in the hospital, Kayne West is going to show up just as baby is crowing and say, “Yo, Jess, I’m gonna let you finish but Kim had one of the best bumps of all time….she had one of the best bumps of all time.” Mark my words (okay, don’t mark my words) it’s going to happen.

PS: I saw this tonight at the grocery store:

It's Called Having A Baby

On the left you see a picture of a very pregnant Kourtney Kardashian (I swear, I’m not trying to pick on these sisters tonight!) and on the right you see her post-baby with the caption “44 LBS in 6 MONTHS! Kourtney shares her diet secrets”. Really?! REALLY?! SERIOUSLY?! If you’re going to compare a before and after weight loss shot, please for the love of all that is holy do not have the “before” picture of someone who is pregnant.

Step One: Get pregnant.

Step Two: Deliver baby.

BOOM. That’s all, folks.

Culture, Daily Life, Society

Uterus: Vacancy (About Drinking)

wine cellar

I’ll be the first to tell you that I enjoy a nice glass of wine every now and then but I’m really not much of a drinker. When my husband and I first found out we were pregnant in September 2009, I stopped drinking. When we lost that pregnancy, we knew we wanted to start trying again as soon as we were in the clear so regular drinking wasn’t a habit I started up again. I would have a little every once in a while but it really only amounted to one drink a month. After C was born, I was giving her breast milk and so drinking was still not something that was on my radar. To be honest, I was glad for the excuse to turn down drinks when I didn’t want one. Now that C is older (she’ll be 2 in February) and we’re not trying to have another child, I don’t have the built-in excuse for not drinking.

I don’t have a problem with alcohol, I’m not sick, there’s nothing wrong with me…

I just don’t feel like having alcohol most of the time. And that’s okay.

For some reason, when women of childbearing age turn down drinks people automatically assume one thing: P-R-E-G-N-A-N-C-Y. Why?

I cannot tell you the number of times I’ve had someone ask me why I’m not drinking…or give me a smile, or a little wink when I turn down a glass of wine but really, honestly, it has absolutely nothing to do with the state of my uterus (which, as I’ve stated before, is empty). I really and truly just prefer iced tea over alcohol. It’s how I am and it’s what I like and I really don’t think there’s anything wrong with that.

So this message goes to all of you who have friends and family in their mid-twenties to mid-thirties who frequently turn down wine or other drinks: STOP ASSUMING WE’RE PREGNANT. Please and thank you. I’m not holding some big secret and I have nothing to hide. If and (/0r) when we ever get pregnant again, I promise I will tell you…until then, let it go.

Culture, Current Events, Daily Life, Parenting

October 15th: National Pregnancy and Infant Loss Remembrance Day

I didn’t want today to pass without saying something about the Pregnancy and Infant Loss Remembrance Day. This month, this day in particular, honors the children mothers will only ever hold in their hearts. Until I had a pregnancy loss of my own in 2009, I had no idea how many women were impacted by miscarriage (and stillbirth) yet it’s something most people don’t talk about. I thought I’d share my story…if you feel inclined to share yours, feel free in the comments.

My husband and I were completely surprised (and elated) to discover we were pregnant in 2009 with an estimated due date of June 6th 2010. We’d just moved into our first home that July and were both settled into jobs we loved. Life was great. We had an ultrasound and announced our pregnancy just after, running under the assumption that everything was going to be just fine. It wasn’t until November 2009 that we found out that we lost the baby. It was a pretty devastating blow to us. It was painful and it was difficult. I remember hearing comments about how it was “God’s Will” or “When you’re ready to be a mommy, God will grant you a baby” and a whole slew of really insensitive remarks by people who didn’t know what else to say other than to try to find some sort of reason for our loss. Here’s the thing about life: sometimes it sucks. Bad things happen…for no reason at all. Less is more. Sometimes a simple, “I’m sorry, let me know if you need anything” or “I’m thinking about you” means the most.

We were given the all clear to start trying again at the end of December and so we started trying immediately thereafter. By April, we still hadn’t gotten pregnant. We took a trip to Disney World with my mom, brother, and my niece who was three years old at the time. On the final day there, we went to Magic Kingdom (just the two of us) and ended up by Cinderella’s “Magic Wishing Well”. We both threw in two pennies and made the same wish…for a happy and healthy pregnancy.

I’m not saying that our wish helped facilitate our pregnancy with C but it does stick with us as a memorable moment in our lives…it was the moment we decided to stop worrying so much about it and let the universe run its course. It did.

We found out that we were pregnant with C on June 22, 2010 and discovered that we’d gotten pregnant with her the same weekend we would have been due with the pregnancy we’d lost. I can’t tell you the number of times I checked for blood in the bathroom and the number of night’s I worried that something might happen with my pregnancy. It didn’t and I have an amazing, incredible, wonderful little girl to show for it.

Today, we’re on the tail end of our vacation back East and we’re spending the night in Orlando, Florida. We spent some time this evening venturing around Downtown Disney. While we were there, I saw some beautiful Disney earings with C’s birth stone (February). I knew I had to have them. How fitting that we were here today, at Disney, which will always hold a very special place in our hearts.

It was where we wished upon a star.

I will never know what our first child would have been like had he or she been born but I am beyond grateful to have C in my life. I learned something through our loss: never take life, no matter how short, for granted and love, always, no matter what.